haku-akuma:

Hello from Josh and Raf and myself

Like a black cloud rollin’ through Tampa.

This guy’s been initiated, indoctrinated, inculcated…

he’s one of us now, hahaha!

So I was talking with humalien, bakufedouin, and rirychan on Skype and I called Julius “cyberpunk” and was met with harsh disagreement from bakufedouin and humalien.  
As an aside regarding the pictures above: I keep coming back to this collection (SS 2009 - Insanity In Industrial Inc. #3 CANON_1 THE POSSESSED) because it’s one of the only runway shows where Julius used exclusively black (feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) and Horikawa managed to show how diverse, flexible and interesting black can be. So many interesting textures and shapes; lots of deep blacks with waviness like deep waters.
But is it cyberpunk? My understanding of cyberpunk is gleaned from a course called Cyberpunk International that is taught by Professor Wlad Godzich at UCSC.  The “cyber” of cyberpunk refers to the organized systems of technology, the internet and society.  The “punk” refers to the rebellion of reinterpreting and modifying (hacking) those systems.  In cyberpunk literature, we see young protagonists employing technology and hacking technology in a way that transgresses the boundaries intended for the system.  Like punk subculture, there is some loss of individuality as the rebel immerses him/herself in the system and re-emerges with an altered self and system.
I need some input. I don’t know enough about the greater context to answer whether Julius is a literal hacking of a system. Perhaps it’s a sort of aesthetic interpretation of the hacked system?  Or is it just borrowing from the punk and industrial subcultures that identified with the cyberpunk narrative? So I was talking with humalien, bakufedouin, and rirychan on Skype and I called Julius “cyberpunk” and was met with harsh disagreement from bakufedouin and humalien.  
As an aside regarding the pictures above: I keep coming back to this collection (SS 2009 - Insanity In Industrial Inc. #3 CANON_1 THE POSSESSED) because it’s one of the only runway shows where Julius used exclusively black (feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) and Horikawa managed to show how diverse, flexible and interesting black can be. So many interesting textures and shapes; lots of deep blacks with waviness like deep waters.
But is it cyberpunk? My understanding of cyberpunk is gleaned from a course called Cyberpunk International that is taught by Professor Wlad Godzich at UCSC.  The “cyber” of cyberpunk refers to the organized systems of technology, the internet and society.  The “punk” refers to the rebellion of reinterpreting and modifying (hacking) those systems.  In cyberpunk literature, we see young protagonists employing technology and hacking technology in a way that transgresses the boundaries intended for the system.  Like punk subculture, there is some loss of individuality as the rebel immerses him/herself in the system and re-emerges with an altered self and system.
I need some input. I don’t know enough about the greater context to answer whether Julius is a literal hacking of a system. Perhaps it’s a sort of aesthetic interpretation of the hacked system?  Or is it just borrowing from the punk and industrial subcultures that identified with the cyberpunk narrative? So I was talking with humalien, bakufedouin, and rirychan on Skype and I called Julius “cyberpunk” and was met with harsh disagreement from bakufedouin and humalien.  
As an aside regarding the pictures above: I keep coming back to this collection (SS 2009 - Insanity In Industrial Inc. #3 CANON_1 THE POSSESSED) because it’s one of the only runway shows where Julius used exclusively black (feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) and Horikawa managed to show how diverse, flexible and interesting black can be. So many interesting textures and shapes; lots of deep blacks with waviness like deep waters.
But is it cyberpunk? My understanding of cyberpunk is gleaned from a course called Cyberpunk International that is taught by Professor Wlad Godzich at UCSC.  The “cyber” of cyberpunk refers to the organized systems of technology, the internet and society.  The “punk” refers to the rebellion of reinterpreting and modifying (hacking) those systems.  In cyberpunk literature, we see young protagonists employing technology and hacking technology in a way that transgresses the boundaries intended for the system.  Like punk subculture, there is some loss of individuality as the rebel immerses him/herself in the system and re-emerges with an altered self and system.
I need some input. I don’t know enough about the greater context to answer whether Julius is a literal hacking of a system. Perhaps it’s a sort of aesthetic interpretation of the hacked system?  Or is it just borrowing from the punk and industrial subcultures that identified with the cyberpunk narrative? So I was talking with humalien, bakufedouin, and rirychan on Skype and I called Julius “cyberpunk” and was met with harsh disagreement from bakufedouin and humalien.  
As an aside regarding the pictures above: I keep coming back to this collection (SS 2009 - Insanity In Industrial Inc. #3 CANON_1 THE POSSESSED) because it’s one of the only runway shows where Julius used exclusively black (feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) and Horikawa managed to show how diverse, flexible and interesting black can be. So many interesting textures and shapes; lots of deep blacks with waviness like deep waters.
But is it cyberpunk? My understanding of cyberpunk is gleaned from a course called Cyberpunk International that is taught by Professor Wlad Godzich at UCSC.  The “cyber” of cyberpunk refers to the organized systems of technology, the internet and society.  The “punk” refers to the rebellion of reinterpreting and modifying (hacking) those systems.  In cyberpunk literature, we see young protagonists employing technology and hacking technology in a way that transgresses the boundaries intended for the system.  Like punk subculture, there is some loss of individuality as the rebel immerses him/herself in the system and re-emerges with an altered self and system.
I need some input. I don’t know enough about the greater context to answer whether Julius is a literal hacking of a system. Perhaps it’s a sort of aesthetic interpretation of the hacked system?  Or is it just borrowing from the punk and industrial subcultures that identified with the cyberpunk narrative? So I was talking with humalien, bakufedouin, and rirychan on Skype and I called Julius “cyberpunk” and was met with harsh disagreement from bakufedouin and humalien.  
As an aside regarding the pictures above: I keep coming back to this collection (SS 2009 - Insanity In Industrial Inc. #3 CANON_1 THE POSSESSED) because it’s one of the only runway shows where Julius used exclusively black (feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) and Horikawa managed to show how diverse, flexible and interesting black can be. So many interesting textures and shapes; lots of deep blacks with waviness like deep waters.
But is it cyberpunk? My understanding of cyberpunk is gleaned from a course called Cyberpunk International that is taught by Professor Wlad Godzich at UCSC.  The “cyber” of cyberpunk refers to the organized systems of technology, the internet and society.  The “punk” refers to the rebellion of reinterpreting and modifying (hacking) those systems.  In cyberpunk literature, we see young protagonists employing technology and hacking technology in a way that transgresses the boundaries intended for the system.  Like punk subculture, there is some loss of individuality as the rebel immerses him/herself in the system and re-emerges with an altered self and system.
I need some input. I don’t know enough about the greater context to answer whether Julius is a literal hacking of a system. Perhaps it’s a sort of aesthetic interpretation of the hacked system?  Or is it just borrowing from the punk and industrial subcultures that identified with the cyberpunk narrative? So I was talking with humalien, bakufedouin, and rirychan on Skype and I called Julius “cyberpunk” and was met with harsh disagreement from bakufedouin and humalien.  
As an aside regarding the pictures above: I keep coming back to this collection (SS 2009 - Insanity In Industrial Inc. #3 CANON_1 THE POSSESSED) because it’s one of the only runway shows where Julius used exclusively black (feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) and Horikawa managed to show how diverse, flexible and interesting black can be. So many interesting textures and shapes; lots of deep blacks with waviness like deep waters.
But is it cyberpunk? My understanding of cyberpunk is gleaned from a course called Cyberpunk International that is taught by Professor Wlad Godzich at UCSC.  The “cyber” of cyberpunk refers to the organized systems of technology, the internet and society.  The “punk” refers to the rebellion of reinterpreting and modifying (hacking) those systems.  In cyberpunk literature, we see young protagonists employing technology and hacking technology in a way that transgresses the boundaries intended for the system.  Like punk subculture, there is some loss of individuality as the rebel immerses him/herself in the system and re-emerges with an altered self and system.
I need some input. I don’t know enough about the greater context to answer whether Julius is a literal hacking of a system. Perhaps it’s a sort of aesthetic interpretation of the hacked system?  Or is it just borrowing from the punk and industrial subcultures that identified with the cyberpunk narrative?

So I was talking with humalien, bakufedouin, and rirychan on Skype and I called Julius “cyberpunk” and was met with harsh disagreement from bakufedouin and humalien.  

As an aside regarding the pictures above: I keep coming back to this collection (SS 2009 - Insanity In Industrial Inc. #3 CANON_1 THE POSSESSED) because it’s one of the only runway shows where Julius used exclusively black (feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) and Horikawa managed to show how diverse, flexible and interesting black can be. So many interesting textures and shapes; lots of deep blacks with waviness like deep waters.

But is it cyberpunk? My understanding of cyberpunk is gleaned from a course called Cyberpunk International that is taught by Professor Wlad Godzich at UCSC.  The “cyber” of cyberpunk refers to the organized systems of technology, the internet and society.  The “punk” refers to the rebellion of reinterpreting and modifying (hacking) those systems.  In cyberpunk literature, we see young protagonists employing technology and hacking technology in a way that transgresses the boundaries intended for the system.  Like punk subculture, there is some loss of individuality as the rebel immerses him/herself in the system and re-emerges with an altered self and system.

I need some input. I don’t know enough about the greater context to answer whether Julius is a literal hacking of a system. Perhaps it’s a sort of aesthetic interpretation of the hacked system?  Or is it just borrowing from the punk and industrial subcultures that identified with the cyberpunk narrative?

bakufedouin replied to your post:Comps
gl scub

Thx?

jacquesct said: 

I’ve had a tailor take in the armholes of a peacoat before and it turned out perfect, so it’s definitely doable.

I took the coat to Berdj and he commented, “this is a nice coat.” He’s typically very reserved so it was nice to get that from him, ha :)

He said the shoulders were just right and that they were relatively similar to the pictures of the other coat I showed him. Altering the armholes could result in pulling across the chest and dimpling around the shoulders - making them tighter it’d be very likely that the coat just wouldn’t lay properly. In the same vein, he recommended not to take in the arms above the bicep - so as not to mess with the fit of the shoulders.

But the body will be taken in significantly (1.5”x2 on each side), he will be slimming the sleeves a bit (.5”x2 on each side), he will take up the sleeve length (1”), and make the buttonholes on the sleeves functional.  These changes significantly alter the appearance of the coat, and I think they’ll give it the lengthening, narrow effect I’m after.

Comps

I guess I haven’t talked much about studying to be a psychotherapist here considering I just started using this space to blog. I’ll be skipping class Thursday because I have to take the comprehensive exam for my Master’s degree on Friday.  It’s a 6 hour test where we write 3 treatment plans.

Treatment plans consist of diagnoses, legal/ethical/diversity concerns, mental status examination, theoretical conceptualization (we have to show we can use Cognitive Behavioral and then 2 family theories… I’m using Structural and Satir), and appropriate interventions.

I’m gonna relax Weds and Thurs night by going to Jiu Jitsu.  That’s my most important self care so I’ll be good if I can do that.  

It’ll seriously be such a huge load of anxiety off me - I’ve been shopping and buying a lot more shit online because of the building stress from my Master’s program (whyyyy did I buy that RO bomber and the Bossert jeans?)… I’ve generally been an anxious wreck.  A reminder alarm going off on my phone today nearly had me steering my car off the road.  I’ve fought matches in front of 1000s of people at the Worlds… why is this making me so nervous?

Look at this guy, copying my thing.  That’s my thing now - get outta here.

Got the Dior coat back from the cleaners.  It took a few extra days (and they nearly gave up trying to remove the pilling - eventually the fabric just can’t take it any more) but it’s like an entirely different coat after the cleaning.  

Tomorrow I’ll take it to my tailor (who recently professed that his specialty is working on men’s jackets) and discuss slimming it.  I’ll ask him if it’s possible to make the armholes narrower while slimming the arm and body of the coat. I know it’ll be possible to taper the arms and body but I’m not sure about narrowing the armholes.

Here are 3 different Hedi Slimane coats.  The far left is SLP (in-store only) Cashmere/Wool crepe with a very slim cut in size 50 - the body was gorgeous with how fitted it was and with the snug arms created a gorgeous lengthening effect but the shoulders were far too narrow.  The middle is SLP Velvet Collar Wool crepe with a loose cut in size 54 - it wasn’t meant to be as slim as the coat on the left but it was the wrong size as the body and shoulders were much too wide.  The coat on the right is a 2007 DH Coat in Wool crepe with a moderate cut in size 54 - the shoulders are the right width but the arms and body are a bit looser than I would like (I’m interested in having the arms/body taken in so that they appear like the coat on the left).

We’ll see what Berdj can do.

Developing Personal Aesthetic Direction

When speaking with my friends Daou (see him here too), Trigg, Azure, and Pollen the question of aesthetic direction frequently comes up.  That is, how are we going to use our resources to pursue a vision for our personal aesthetic; what are we going to buy to develop how we want to look?

It’s a tricky question and one that I think many people explore through the use of inspiration albums.  It’s one that’s subject to personal whimsy, too.  I find that almost any time I look at pictures of an interesting designer’s work I want to pursue that aesthetic be it Altieri’s, Saberi’s, Margiela’s or Harnden’s.  But for many I’ve explored, I’ve found it hard to enter the world they create.  But with Horikawa, Poell and Slimane I find their worlds relevant and accessible.  I say accessible in that I can mentally enter their world; identify with and relate to their imagery; and find enjoyment in it.

I feel like the way I relate to designs has a lot to do with the construct I have for “cool” in my head.  I think the way we understand “cool” is a culturally constructed and relatively arbitrary association but I think it’s related to a core human feeling.  I’m sure in a sort of tribal state of nature there was still the feeling of cool - it’s the feeling of seeing someone who is sexually fit and observing the way they are and the things they do.  Cool is the emotion we feel seeing the behavior, style and way of being of individuals who appear sexually fit.  It can be abstracted onto other things through a sort of classical conditioning but I think it fundamentally comes from that place. I think it’s fairly universal to want to access that feeling of cool with our behaviors, style and way of being.  It seems to be a strong subconscious current that drives many human behaviors whether they be socially constructive, personally enriching or seemingly narcissistic.

I grew up in Los Angeles - a city torn between the transhumanistic future of Blade Runner and the Rock and Roll past of The Doors.  I grew up in a neighborhood with pleasant facades covering our view of a massive industrial oil refinery (Chevron’s El Segundo Refinery).  My early impressions of cool were the science fiction that seemed accessible if only I took the right route on the freeway; the glam punk of Rock Goggle Fantasy at The Smell, Suzy’s, and The Whiskey a Go Go; and the eerie spots I would find to play or skate in that sat between suburban paradise and industrial wasteland.

I feel like Tatsuro Horikawa’s cyberpunk future, Hedi Slimane’s rockstar glam luxrury, and Carol Christian Poell’s deformed constructions (that seem suited to clothe residents who mutated after remaining by Chernobyl) fit in elegantly with the early experiences where I accessed cool.

So what do I call this aesthetic direction I hope to take?  The aesthetic style of these three are fairly incongruent.  Horikawa’s drapey stacks don’t match Slimane’s clean lines but they both create slim silhouettes on slim figures. Poell’s sharp corners are sometimes paired with warped edges, fighting with the clean geometry of Horikawa.  But the mythos of these three designers does seem to lie in a relatively near future - three parts of the same city of 2050. Hell, maybe you’d even see all three styles in the Los Angeles of Blade Runner.  It depends where you go in this city’s dark future.

I hope to acquire pieces in order to develop a wardrobe that allows me to dress for those different places in dark urban futures - the cyberpunk alleyways, the glam rock shows, and the edge between civilization and industrial ruination.

Scoute Interview of Julius designer, Tatsuro Horikawa

Avant-garde author William S. Burroughs created  “Interzone” to represent a metaphorical, stateless area loosely based on post war Tangier, which became a haven for criminals, artists, drug smugglers and tax evaders due to its falling between rules and laws. The head-quarters of Tatsuro Horikawa, the mastermind behind infamous Japanese clothing phenomenon Julius, seems to occupy a similarly ambiguous place.

Prologue

Located somewhere in-between various well-known areas such as big city Shinjuku, shopping paradise Shibuya and trend central Harajuku, Sendagaya is hard to classify and the Julius HQ even harder to find. The Atelier is a concrete bunker, whose entrance can only be found hidden behind tight rows of black, high-powered motorbikes and the designers own “Batmobile” lookalike BMW, which he uses for inspirational runs around the city and to connect him to his factory-like Industrial Art Space on it’s outskirts. Once down the steep stairs, one can enter a concrete warren of black clad disciples all intensely engaged in various aspects of disseminating the Julius Aesthetic into the outside environment. It looks more like an anarchist sect or religious cult than a fashion movement, and in fact, “fashion” is not really a word that Tatsuro Horikawa cares much about. In the space there is original Horikawa designed metal furniture and several of his own bronze art pieces and paintings as well as giant prints from the latest MA shoot. It is here, that he oversees every aspect of the creation of his collections, from the coating on the denim to the music mixed specially for the cat-walk and the pictures for the look-book. Everything is done in-house and much of it, for example the photography and styling, personally by the designer and his assistants.

The man himself is also difficult to track down. Doing much of his designing very early in the morning and finding much of his inspiration very late at night, early evening is the time he spends in production meetings and testing out new designs. In fact it soon becomes apparent that the designer and his staff are usually dressed head to toe in prototypes from future collections as well as his own archive, resulting in pieces on the Paris runway which have already been road-tested to the limit. When in residence, surrounded by staff, clothed totally in black, covered in esoteric tattouage and with his trade-mark intense gaze, he is instantly recognisable. One might say that his soft spoken voice and shy friendly manner come as somewhat of a welcome surprise.

The Discussion
 

You were born in Kyushu in the south of Japan where the people are supposed to be passionate, energetic and hard-working. Tell about your background.

I was born in Kyushu but I moved to Tokyo as early as possible. Tokyo is very much a part of who I am, but it is not the everyday Tokyo of tourists and salary-men, but more of an alternate Tokyo of the mind. A big influence on my early years was the manga and movie “Akira” which tells of Neo-Tokyo, a post apocalyptic megalopolis. It is this Tokyo which is MY Tokyo, it exists in my consciousness and in the consciousness of a whole generations who saw “Akira” , “Blade Runner” and “Mad Max”. It is a Tokyo shaped by Techno and Industrial Music and underground culture which exists right alongside the “normal” city and I was very much immersed in this kind of cyber-punk reality. My personal background is 100% based in the underground culture and I will always exist here in the Neo-Tokyo underground.

When I was younger and active in the underground rave scene, of course we experienced many problems with authorities, just as did the youth all across the world. Techno was like the second coming of the Punk revolution and a lot of people tried to crush our rebellion. We were doing a lot of experimentation and pushing against the limits of control. I guess this shaped my thinking also.


 

Neo-Tokyo sounds like the “Interzone” concept of W.S. Burroughs. He once said that he wrote in order to create the world he wished to see exist. Is this why you design?

Well, Julius was born 7 years ago, we just celebrated the 7 year anniversary because 7 is a very special number for us, for many different esoteric reasons. However, to get the whole story about me and about Julius, you need to go way back to 1996, to my first clothing related project, NUKE. Its very much a part of our story and history, but because it was underground and because of language barriers etc. between East and West, people tend to think that Julius suddenly arrived in the last few years and compare us to some of the newer western brands, without knowing just how deep our roots go. I think this is a cause for a lot of confusion when people talk about who did what first, particularly regarding underground culture and the use of industrial motifs, but this was what NUKE was all about.

I was creating artworks immersed deep in the techno underworld. I was going out to these really intense clubs and doing graphics and visuals, graffiti etc. I was reading lots of Burroughs, William Gibson who was the father of cyberpunk, and the graphic work of Moebius and Enki Bilal which included steampunk touches. Eventually we got a lot of requests and decided to print some of the work onto t-shirts and thus Nuke was started in 1996.

Basically, all my work is trying to balance my darker interests; fetishism, Cyberpunk and industrial cultures with the lighter spiritual side of my creation – the Zen and Tibetan Buddhist influence in my work which has lately grown to include the spirituality of many different cultures. But these things all started with Nuke. For Nuke to become Julius was more of a name change, and a change of our company structure. In a way we stopped being a bad boy outfit and became a professional company, but we were and still are pure underground artists and this is never going to change no matter what happens. Even after debuting in Paris and going international I feel that we are closing the circle and I am returning back to my early roots.

 
In addition to the techno and punk influences, Julius famously seems to have very strong industrial and military references.

I have been talking about my very early influences and of course these still have a strong hold on me, but nowadays when I talk about “Industrial”, I am thinking more of people like Richard Serra who works with metals and steel to produce really industrial scale Art pieces. Its very uncompromising stuff and this is my attitude also. There are other visual artists who I talk about a lot when describing my work, like Joseph Beuys and Christian Boltanski who are not so much industrial but are very, very modern. And of course Anselm Kieffer who combines monumental work with an intensely personal spirituality. A balance I wish to achieve also.

The Military aspect is much easier to explain; it gave birth to an aesthetic of practical, functional and very cool minimal clothing which is a central part of what we do. Recently this has become our concept of clothing for urban SURVIVALISM. As times get harder and tougher , as we move further into a Neo-Tokyo type reality, we are creating clothes to deal with the new harsh conditions and to protect our inner sensitivity and spirituality.

In recent years the label has expanded quickly overseas, was this carefully planned or did it happen more on its own and were you happy with the expansion?

Well, I cannot say it was carefully planned because there is always an element of chaos in my work and process which keeps things exciting and fresh. I think this was more just inevitable! The truth is, I always designed with an international idea in my mind. These were not collections made just for Japanese or Asian people, these were expressions of the feeling I wanted to express at the time. As much as I am influenced by my background, I feel like a citizen of the planet and not limited to one cultural outlook or style. There were people around me who urged me to go to Paris, to show as many people as possible what we were actually doing here. They were worried that too many labels were beginning to make their names using some of our ideas and influences but this never really bothered me. People are telling me the same thing about showing our women’s wear again and this is something we are beginning to consider for the near future.

I am happy to reach as many sympathetic people as I can with what we are trying to do. This is the reason for having a runway show. However creating a show each season is difficult because it makes us part of the “fashion game” and we have to play by certain silly rules, some of which we do not particularly respect. In the end it is all worth it if we can make something beautiful and meaningful for the world.

  

 
So it can be assumed that Paris hasn’t changed Julius?

No, not at all! Except I feel the pressure of always needing to show something “new”. To tell the truth the whole Paris fashion circus is totally not my style. My style is something I take over there, not from it. It does make me try harder to create a space between Julius and other labels. I am happy to try to create greater originality in my creative expression.

How are the Julius garments born?

My process stems from my youth as I have mentioned, everything is a continuation of that but recently my process begins when watching movies, listening to music while driving through the city, traveling and experiencing art. I get a lot of inspiration from the atmosphere of all these things. I try to imagine how certain things and places will look in the near future, the whole environment of these places. What kind of place will NYC be, how will Prague look? and then I guess I begin to sketch what I can imagine and this becomes the basis of the collection and thus reality. Just as Burroughs wrote what he wanted to see, I can design for my future reality. I can create Neo-Tokyo or NYC right here and now or at least in the next 6 months. I take these ideas and together with my team we make them a practical reality.

I am not sure about other labels but as you can see we have been a very strong, close-knit team here that is capable of trying many new and unorthodox techniques in order to produce any effect we may desire. We try to experiment with new techniques and materials as much as possible and try to vary our approach as I definitely believe that no interesting result can come from boring, repetitive methods. We try to do as much as possible in-house and hands on, just like painters and sculptors in their studios. Most of our manufacturing is done here in Japan but we do sometimes outsource special fabrics to places like Italy, when it is absolutely necessary. We also make sample after sample and every member of staff gets to test out any item for practicality, durability and ease of use. If they do not like it, it does not get produced.

 
Recently there seems to have been a slew of similar “dark” labels and designers, some Japanese, some American and more recently some Europeans. One of the things that seem to unite them is the use of draping, something that until recently could usually be found mostly on women’s clothing.

As much as I try not to pay much attention to what others are doing, I think that there is indeed a fundamental difference and I think that is a very important one. As you mentioned “draping” comes from a classical, historic tradition and is usually associated with a feminine, elegant look. I think that this can be seen in the designs of most of the labels you are referring to. Julius does include design which could on first glance conform to this aesthetic. However, I think my design is coming from a very different place and I can sum it up in one word - damage.

When I create a painting, sculpture or item of clothing i am trying to externalize a feeling that I have inside of me and often what I feel inside are very mixed dark emotions; pain, frustration and anger at society. This comes out in the clothing as damage to the structure and to the fabric. I hate the image of conventional beauty and when I see something looking too perfect, I like to attack it and this results in what people see as drape, which is actually a dragging and distortion of the material upon the body of the wearer. The clothes actually have to be well made and high quality because of the punishment that they receive. When I style a photo shoot I really like to drag, twist and manipulate the clothes into new shapes and attitudes. Just like in people, I think that this distressing process is often the best way to expose the soul hidden beneath.

Tell a bit about GOTH_IK, the upcoming FW2010 collection.

The unusual spelling of the theme is very much intentional. Julius has often been compared with Gothic culture and I wanted to explore some of the connections between my design and that world in all its forms. I also wanted to perhaps rescue and rehabilitate the genre whose name seems to have become cheapened and misunderstood in recent times. This is not what people have come to assume from this word. This is MY own personal take on the subject.

People tend to forget that gothic culture encompasses not only the music and an interest in the occult, but also architecture, art, literature and so on. I took time to rediscover these influences and try to juxtapose and combine gothic elements in terms of both the high and low-brow forms - the classical and the sub-cultural sides. So as well as clothing influenced by the eighties darker post-punk groups such as Bauhaus, I also want to combine this with the tailoring of a vampiric dandy and the draping and simplicity of a monk from that era. I want to take it into the abstract. I want to destroy the cliche and to redefine it. I want people to come and see our runway and have their assumptions and expectations challenged with a new perspective.

Epilogue

At this point, it was time for Horikawa to disappear back into the heart of his underground domain to oversee another of the countless projects which seem to constantly be revolving around him. Before he left, we pressed him on a story which sounded like shadowy legend in the face of the hard-edged industry of his (Neo-) Tokyo lair, and one which he had failed to mention when asked about his personal influences or background. A few seasons ago he had, uncharacteristically for a fashion designer, taken the step of posting a protest on the Julius website in solidarity with the people of Tibet in the face of the invasion by the Chinese authorities. When asked about this, he had mentioned a trip to Tibet and I was anxious to hear more details about this and how it had affected him if it was indeed true. Occupied Tibet seems like a long way from either Interzone or Neo-Tokyo for that matter.

At first reticent to go into details, Horikawa eventually revealed that the trip did indeed take place 3 years ago in 2006. He crossed over from China into Tibet in October of that year and then made his way by jeep to Lhasa. There, he spent over 2 weeks in a temple and befriended one of the monks who taught him, amongst other things, over 200 different ways to arrange the traditional Tibetan Buddhist robe (also the source of the Julius “blood” red color). It’s very obvious that he sees this trip as something of a spiritual pilgrimage, a word he often likes to use to describe his collections, and he mentions the fact that he felt closer to what he describes as the spirit of God than he had experienced until that point in his life. He also revealed that through a combination of travel and altitude sickness as well as frequent contact with Tibetan sake, he had ended up in the hospital and in an extremely dangerous state. It is quite obvious that this “secret” episode from the designers life is also one of the most important keys to it and one which explains just as much about what he is doing with his Art as did Beuys’ plane crash in the Crimea, Warhol’s childhood illness or Burrough’s shooting of his wife.

As our actual world and lives become more and more like Julius’ apocalyptic Neo-Tokyo / Interzone visions, one wonders where Horikawa will try to take us in the coming months and if he will ever truly find peace and the balance between the dark and light forces he continues to invoke and use in his creation. 

Interview with Tatsuro Horikawa of Julius

from an article originally in Japanese on Next33, translated using Chrome’s Google Translate

New brand “JULIUS (Julius)” that appeared from March to 33. Art group of the topic of most now that you start the activity from 2002 and “JULIUS”. It is an art project notable continue to express the view of the world using any representation music, graphics, video, and clothing. Members lineup eminent director Mr. Kodaira NUKE art director Mr. Horikawa, SBK Creative Director Mr. John Doe, video production team of “Ichi hundred expressions”, and AUTONOGRAPH Yoshikawa. Appearance of activ8 of first shot in 2003, which is performed in 3/29 (Sat) next time in order to convey the feeling of air view of the world and also their emergency decision! So interviewed Tatsuro Horikawa of NUKE art director to serve the total direction of “JULIUS” in the free paper this time. I ask you also about the future and worried about the “NUKE”.

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I want to hear about NUKE future first, but rumors is not it was flowing from around the end of last year and I “? Gonna gone I NUKE”. Do you do what about a matter of fact. Gonna quit?

Horikawa: No, it is paused. The reason can not be is at once the two brands and NUKE called JULIUS (Julius). NUKE’ve got a plan to get the rest only spring and summer so far, but I state I do not know yet the fall and winter. And I think we probably do not do. And I was thinking because the border had been lost NUKE itself is as good as saying even JULIUS from around the fall and winter of last year, and I wonder if even if a transition.

Motivation will not rise again for NUKE?

Horikawa: Without motivation at all those industrial base say ah … Now. The report that you rest for the spring and summer for the time being.

The fans wonder if understand?

Horikawa: I think get to be convinced Moraere a look at what you leave in JULIUS now. But not anymore NUKE, which has been the theme of industrial such as cyberpunk and it is not completely transferred to the keyword Tteyuu chaos, more than JULIUS are doing a keyword Tteyuu chaos, and I ask them catch the name I changed I think.

I’m think Yeah, so nice. The’m just think the brand itself Tteyuu NUKE is the Tteyuu what will want to hear I’m sure everyone. NUKE so power brand fanatics often.

Horikawa: Yeah, but I have a cousin in to be asked to the troubled …

Now you do not even know it yourself?

Horikawa: That’s right. I want to do is I want to do, but I am I feel it if there is something timing.

Wonder if feeling please look at the people JULIUS NUKE liked because I invested in the best brand Tteyuu Julian two be able to now anyway.

Horikawa: Yes. But NUKE as the brand of clothes only to pause, I get by NUKE name in the work of graphic or was VJ. U~eawa graphics work originally - because there was no difference in clock, and although I have not stopped speaking that it has not stopped.

Get it. NUKE credit that is why I left. That there is also JULIUS essence Nari taste of NUKE.

Horikawa: Yeah. It is the finish that might get to saying “Jan NUKE” If Moraere look such as T-shirt of the summer Nde, I want to get a look by all means.

But not cyberpunk?

Horikawa: Because had gone almost cyber-punk from around the fall of 2002. If there is a part that was crowded and create Kodaira Mr. and Mr. Shigeo since then another, and it probably it was a transition period to JULIUS. I wonder it may also be that I want to do in the industrial line, and I like to also but Well. I do not even know me so far that time.

So please tell us about JULIUS where the name of the members came out. Can you introduce one person. Oh, can I take out Mr. Shigeo name What?

Horikawa: Dont like. And I heard a bad name I only John Doe there in various ways. ○ Please write such as BK. ○ ○ such as Bokingu.

It’s Barebare (laughs) So thank you to his introduction.

Horikawa: Mr. Shigeo amazing elegant. It is the antenna of the most in JULIUS. Role to convey such as air flow such as of now to me to tell us to come collect what mode-like. Ideas is funny anyway. Wonder if feeling sampler come from various sampling a strange place. Mr. Shigeo just go find a theme that is central most of JULIUS, but it is synchronized in this day and age apparently. It is music in charge of the rest.

I’m a person appear before or rather the main character, of JULIUS,

Horikawa: Icon. Charisma be idle. Shigeo’m reluctant to use the word ‘s charisma (laughs).

Kodaira-kun?

Horikawa: Kodaira-kun person who becomes somehow even take me to what it would do something. It is not withdrawn in absolute seemed anxious I lost not to persuade the absolute opponent. I have a sense of security to the side to make because there are people like him. Kodaira-kun himself’m also a human side to create really you are doing band called pre-school, but it is divided exactly and when something produced with the place to make it out to our own. There is great. We’ve got to say something to say Gyagya Phi Phi, but I will I gather it all. We can be I liked Phi Phi Gyagya because there are Kodaira Mr. To put it the opposite. It is a person who is willing to make can free people to work, that kind of base. It should have been to yourself to judgment and I do not sell sell while production at the time of NUKE, and who was also entrenched to bring the feeling of when you create. But it is a lot of fun because you put out without thinking Nan’nimo now. And I think it’s so all three people.

Load was heavy is NUKE?

Horikawa: Yeah. Weight I do not even now Kawan but it such as, wonder if get by because I wonder what are … 3 people Ah, but. It is feeling Na they’ve go without such special stress.

Three did you had known for a long time originally?

Horikawa: Last year, about two years ago wonder. Mr. Shigeo and Kodaira-kun acquainted that was doing band originally, Naa do not remember so much Kodaira-kun and I It was first met … (laughs).

Did not you’re such as visitor of the shop?

Horikawa: Aso’s, Mr. Yoshikawa is AUTONOGRAPH me to bring, I was suddenly hit it off when they met. Year-old I’m the same to Mr. Shigeo Kodaira and Kimi to Boku. I’m a movie together such as that we have seen such as those so we have heard. Such as the fact that I want to do such as that you’ve been wondering. If you are doing all music. I’m had dropped out.

It ‘s fun and I go in creating something child of the same generation are gathered.

Horikawa: Yeah. For the first time for this. The sooo easy to do things.

By the way, do you think three people who were working in different places is became I try to do together that’s why?

Horikawa: I think there was a little sense of impasse to everyone, and I was like I want the activities of sub with which to do really for what you are doing. And to think three because both had come as a leader in each place, it’s Tteyuu want to escape from such a Toko also there. It Is not I be trying to do in the other unit is also kind of guys Once you have gathered. It is a feeling without any resistance at all to the bottom, I have come to form normally while I talk In the ordinary. Leading to now you are starting too soon. It has become the very good flow Nde, I was determined to be nice even went to one on the rest for the NUKE.

What kind of roles like?

Horikawa: Mr. Shigeo and I naughty boy I mean naughty. Really Kodaira Mr.’m the worst (laughs). I want to form Kodaira Mr. together when we are saying own way. There is also the reverse of course, there is also a thing to Mr. Shigeo I move the parts business basis or was press that Mr. Kodaira proposed. Everybody out whatever was rising lead, I like that it a graphic with the sound, and it is no boundary so much or rather there is also to be similar.

I’m capable of various field everyone everyone.

Horikawa: Yeah. It wants to do a lot of things. Kodaira Shigeo Kimi Kimi to do to coach I also do supervision you were a little guy, and sound know, you do also with two people. And I also do styling model and with respect to Mr. Shigeo. Mr. Shigeo I did the director of the PV of my band, but yeah, I’m out I it (laughs).

My friend I was saying “I’m an actor Horikawa-kun” (laughs).

Horikawa: Role Tteyuu become houseplant plant crazed is the last morphing.

Amazing.

Horikawa: And I go in the form crisp and are in the three anyway. What is “I’ll do here” Then someone starts to do one person “I here in charge” Then I. And then this I gathered and I Serve in JULIUS name.

The Tteyuu old all the same I guess easy to do after all.

Horikawa: I completely different. Background because he is completely together, tedious explanation does not need to.

The Kke’m many years I?

Horikawa: Is 28. 29 soon.

Generation of 28 and 29 I’m gonna be JULIUS now. I do not think so ‘s something you come out in various ways between generations Nde I think Tteyuu has become one brand in a comprehensive way it is very interesting.

Horikawa: I’m a generation subtle little we. Amazing half-hearted. Do not know also the head of techno, and that after the mixture is raised really even within a generation that I do not know well.

There Is not it funny. I’m gonna have a look at what is coming out now in the how to catch.

Horikawa: Last felt biting a little punk, and I try to lick also beatnik.

But cyberpunk was still tired yet? (Laughs)

Horikawa: Do not feel good, rather than out to the mouth one by one and because I already ingrained, I be nice, rather than out in the table. I’m doing like “Minority Report” properly (laughs).

Is it what specifically I place that became a branch point everyone will have in common?

Horikawa: It is a lock. Rock around the time of mixture such as grunge came out. Such as Nine Inch Nails Susaidaru of late. It is a time when we were listening music most days of 17 and 18. The ministry later. It is flowing to the underlying.

Well then rather than a grunge after all I’m industrial (laughs). By the way I’m talking back, but the meaning of the named JULIUS What?

Horikawa: Real meaning Julius Caesar emperor. And are you coming from julius in july even after July. I was meaning was goth elegant little, but I are becoming more implications minimum now. Meaning symbolic or rather what it icon.

There is no special meaning, and do not want to fix the image.

Horikawa: That’s right. To no logo. I thought I did not can be fixed logo of NUKE also be changed every season, and of going in JULIUS story. I also I get bored too soon Shigeo you.

In Please briefly tell us the activities of until now.

Horikawa: I’ve done the clothes of fact, we have each other on display Shigeo kun is doing much live exhibition of the first time. Is there it’s Tteyuu would like to propose the entire space always JULIUS. Is not there is a style of life if there is a clothes if there is a place if there is a sound. I have come all the way in such feeling. I was doing a party in Kyoto in September, but “JULIUS-wildlife extermination Awareness Month -” and I do Let doing a little interesting because it is Kyoto I was doing on the subject of.

Jewellery butterfly network job?

Horikawa: The seemed in trouble crow at most I Kyoto, I like it “has been getting rid of crow” hanging on the floor by creating a huge highlight of the big balloon that much 3M as an art object. So you have created or even T-shirt, I Though it is for fun Well. I have done exhibition in Daikanyama in December the rest.

I’m I was allowed to go there, but I was the exhibition of hardware and video sound completely another. Pure feeling is now in clear positive.

Horikawa: Is it so? Motif is negative Na’m were many that you’re doing (laughs).

Yeah, the video I had been muddy indeed.

Horikawa: The’m think it is mushy in the dark than NUKE. The theme’s to chaos. I also Shigeo Kimi grotesque like to’m feeling a “grotesque more grotesque more”. Now, I have created in the fall and winter, but things such as … We’ll gonna hair in all (laughs). It Is not are like riding feels painful. That kind of is be nice.

I know. I felt those punch-through something. That space was comfortable.

Horikawa: Part you have originally I do not probably would come out really (laughs).

The first thing out of his mouth was not released to the general public only stakeholders because it was the exhibition at that time.

Horikawa: Yeah, I also happen to believe it I wonder if I be released now.

And I think I see that’s something I JULIUS Yeah, without having to describe in words If you are in there.

Horikawa: I think there is I do not do and not transmitted to the end user, but it and let’s tell in the event that you think let’s do it now. Shop I can after. I think smell say oh also shop the whole there have always been, to try to feel like such a scaled-down version of the exhibition.

Now, the shop I’m able to the location of the NUKE. Do you going to be what kind of shop?

Horikawa: Business itself has been thought to wind Tteyuu exhibition. To be wanna, we are going in the form of the ever-changing more and more content.

Surface, It is white. Let’s notice also Papers and also Once you have determined in detail.

Horikawa: Activ8 it is in March after!

So please tell me about the unit called MOLD you get appeared as JULIUS.

Horikawa: A double feature I, is on fire now, and What does it try it until you burn out is about 5 years the clothes properly, it’m a live rendition of the MOLD.

Power is on fairly?

Horikawa: Yes. Much cold cuts of Japan in the world lightly next be nabbed! I want out of the WARP (laughs).

But maybe there is really it. Is not there is also a cousin you are looking at where the range of activities not only remained in the music like such as Vincent Gallo WARP. It ‘s should I Yarere live abroad.

Horikawa: Yeah, I mean the UK overseas. Because it is the United Kingdom all those that are affected.

Sound of JULIUS Though likely received in the United States. Do you think What kind of live in activ8 it back to talk?

Horikawa: We are going to try that it got towards the VJ sound signals emitted from the side of Shigeo Mr. using MIDI, and Firefox 3.0, a video so put out timing.

Synchronize?

Horikawa:  Rather than ‘s VJ in the keeps flowing video just like multiplying effect to say I sync, the side you have live or operate the video, and you can produce sound from VJ to reverse. I think that it becomes I feel it ‘s there is no boundary of VJ and sound so much.

It is new it.

Horikawa: It is not there a little I live I are synchronized while there is improvisation of far. And to not doing in Shirikomu. For example, I have a song that contains the sampling of voice that is saying “Mexico” William Burroughs in the song MOLD, but about that Burroughs of video to talk me “Mexico -” to match it I can easily. I would not give maybe too solid (laughs). The most important thing of lock it Is not improvisation. I am always thinking How can I wonder if I do to produce so as not to destroy it.

It might be a strange feeling gradually when I only fit so much. I wonder if I will make you feel and performance MOLD in all, not the concept of VJ and live normal.

Horikawa: Yes. I think I might be some people that I saw, so I did live at a party called CYCLONE of WOMB, but at the end of December, and I should Moraere think that it is the development of any type. It is the second stage.

I do go I “-for tomorrow-by julius” in the subtitle of this activ8 after, but what does this mean?

Horikawa: Joe tomorrow (laughs). Rather than the theme itself is JULIUS I Is not it part of one of them. The media basis “We are imprinted” or “has been manipulated” or. So to get out of here? Things like that I’m a theme, but where it Nde I did not want to … Owarashi.

It is that, forrader. In the thank you message something to people who come to activ8.

Horikawa: Nde I is going to be such a hero that day. It is aimed at (laughs).

We hope! Are there any that you’d like to say as an after JULIUS?

Horikawa: Please write I have a burning ladies. Next season I’m a lady’s main.

Is that so. How are you created on the assumption who wear me JULIUS?

Horikawa: Mens Shigeo you. Ladies I’m an image in my head. And I realized that I Na just have Butsukere the personal desires I Ladies more recently. It has created upside down Dotanbatan in my head such as you think should have a child that has such a shape. It can not be helped ladies is fun.

It ‘s were out of time NUKE also Tsu ladies?

Horikawa: And I were going but, I was like you have too much to worry about the format of Tteyuu Ladies, have not been released. Men just or had only been small after. It has been or is fed back to the men it is created before the ladies now. Also, I’ve got a vice versa. It is the design which is soothing loose sleeveless all. I’m cool. The kana going to do to the collection Atohigashi Colle season.

In Maji What? ? Amazing.

Horikawa: It Is not seen in parallel with the brand of “other. I’m looking forward to really. I believe that grand that. I want to put to the United Kingdom. Home you want to advance to the UK in about next year after that.

glacierism said: what does it look like?

It’s this coat:

image

But I’m going to get it tailored in the arms and the body so it’s a much more slim fit like this:

image

So I was supposed to pick up my new (used) archive Dior coat from the cleaners today but it was so dirty they had to send it out to some place for extensive deep cleaning and de-pilling.  Impressively filthy.  They need more time to make it shiny.

another of me and Eric from 3/22 at Fliquorbean’s spot at Naud.  It was a warehouse in Chinatown where a collective of hipsters infuse whisky with coffee and call it Fliquorbean. It had the feel of a hobo shanty-town as everyone had a disheveled, vintage hipstery look. They all very obviously frequented Crossroads trading post. Tweed and thrift weren’t out of place but I looked like I was from a different future in Julius.  Some hi-tec low life stumbling into a hippie collective.

Avant Garde/Goth Ninja Guide 2.0

When I first became involved with Reddit’s MaleFashionAdvice forum in 2012, it seemed like any outfit with more than 2 pieces of black received the comment “gtfo, gothninja.” In 2013, there was hardly a month when an all black fit didn’t make Top of WAYWT. Here’s an album compiled from MFA’s Top of WAYWT from 2013.

The GN Strategy Guide used the blanket term “Goth Ninja” in a tongue-in-cheek way and used images that fall under a number of aesthetics within fashion. Most of the pictures from Part I were borrowed from the Stylezeitgeist WAYWT thread. Almost all of the outfits could be called “avant-garde” instead of “Goth Ninja.” Avant-garde is a broad term and can be used to refer to almost any experimental fashion or art. A large part of the aesthetic featured in that guide can be attributed to the work of Maurizio Altieri and the various brands of those that worked with him. These inclide Carpe Diem, L’Maltieri, MA+, Lumen et Umbra, Label Under Construction, A Dicianoveventire, Sistere and MarvieLab. While there are a variety of styles pictured in Part I, many of the looks from StyleZeitgeist follow that aesthetic that grew out of the work of Maurizio Altieri while including labels with similar aesthetics such as Obscur, Layer-0, Paul Harnden and Carol Christian Poell.

Another avant-garde trend that was featured in that guide is sometimes referred to as "street goth" (see Skingraft). This style can be loud and covered with labels as in Kanye West and A$AP Rocky’s “Rap Goth” style (see Givenchy’s AW13 and SS13 collections and Preston’s Style Profile) or more subdued with fewer logos, but still with an emphasis on sportswear (see Rick Owens and Charly’s Style Profile). Trends like "Black Metal Serfwear" (see Odyn Vovk and this photoshoot) and other dark, futuristic styles (see Julius) could be described as falling in a similar vein as street goth.

Other designers that are currently popular in discussions of avant-garde fashion include the work of Hedi Slimane (of Dior Homme and Saint Laurent), Rei Kawabuko (of Comme Des Garcons), Ann Demeulemeester, Raf Simons, Ahmed Abdelrahman (of Thamanyah), and Boris Bidjan Saberi.  Keep in mind, there are a great many more designers who currently fall under the blanket term “avant-garde” - it would be a futile effort for me to try and list them here.

"“Avant-garde” is advanced and individual thinking. The exact translation from french means “before the crowd or the mass”, therefore it can never be trendy nor fashionable.” - Carol Christian Poell

at Fliquorbean headquarters at Naud